Preliminary programme and programme team

preliminary programme

From keynote lectures to refresher courses, from interventional hands on training to ultrasound workshops, from ‘Children in Focus’ to the fascinating world of artificial intelligence, ECR 2020 offers a wide range of topics, teaching formats and training opportunities for all.

Preliminary Programme

The ECR 2020 Programme Team Brochure includes all the Programme Planning Committee Members, the Scientific Subcommittee Chairpersons and the staff members of the ECR Scientific Programme Department.
 

Programme Team Brochure

ECR 2020 Highlights

Opening
Wednesday, March 11 (17:45)

Plenary Lectures
Bernd Montag; Erlangen/DE
Nenad Sestan; New Haven, CT/US
Ralph Weissleder; Boston, MA/US

Image Interpretation Quiz
Junior Image Interpretation Quiz
Children in Focus

Artificial Intelligence

Grand Finale
Sunday, March 15 (12:30)

Artificial Intelligence

The ECR 2020 scientific programme brings to all its attendees a clear vision of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology. From the informative courses dedicated to European Excellence in Education (E³), to the New Horizons, Coffee & Talk and AIX Theatre sessions (coming soon!), participants can expect a thorough exploration of the foundations of the field as well as fascinating insights into the latest AI discoveries in radiology.

Coffee & Talk (open forum)

Imaging biobanks: from concept to implementation
AI and the future of imaging: European funding prospects

E³ - Advanced Courses: Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence in radiology: the basics you need to know
Artificial intelligence for image reconstruction: towards deep imaging?
Artificial intelligence and translations to clinical practice
Radiomics: principles and applications
Artificial intelligence and clinical decision support
Challenges and solutions for introducing artificial intelligence (AI) in daily clinical workflow
Making visible the invisible: pushing the boundaries in multimodality radiomic quantification

E³ - Advanced Courses: Hot Topics in Emergency Radiology

Dual energy and subtraction CT in emergency radiology

E³ - ECR Master Class

Artificial intelligence in breast imaging: potential perspectives and (unjustified) fears
Quantitative imaging in oncology

ESR meets Canada

Tales from the Canadian Frontier

ESR meets Israel

Radiology in Israel: technology and professionalism

ESR Patient Advisory Group (ESR-PAG)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) in radiology: meeting expectations and benefiting outcomes

ESTI Session: Lung Cancer Screening certification

Lung nodule management and lung cancer screening workshop

EuroSafe Imaging Session

Artificial intelligence for dose optimisation

ISRRT meets Canada

Radiography profession performance and future challenges in Canada

ISRRT meets Japan

Radiography profession performance and future challenges in Japan

Joint Session of the EFRS and ISRRT

Artificial intelligence and the radiographer profession

New Horizons Session

Alzheimer's disease and neurodegeneration: visualising the invisible

Professional Challenges Session

Audit and value in clinical radiology: enhancing quality

Refresher Course

Lung nodule management in 2020
Everything you need to know about 3D post-processing

Special Focus Session

Update in head and neck cancer imaging
Evaluating oncologic treatment response in clinical practice and trials

Hands-on Workshops

The hands-on component of the ECR 2020 scientific programme encourages attendees to practice and test their existing skills whilst simultaneously adopting the latest techniques in Ultrasound in a new and interactive way.

The MRI hands-on workshops are already a well-established tradition at ECR, with this year’s programme including workshops on MRI of Prostate and MRI of the Pelvic Floor.

Radiographers‘ Programme

The ECR is recognised as the official annual scientific meeting in medical imaging for radiographers by both the European Federation of Radiographer Societies (EFRS) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR). ECR 2020 offers a comprehensive and perfectly tailored programme for radiographers in various stages of experience.

Coffee and Talk (open forum)

Quality and safety in paediatric imaging
Clinical audit and the European-Basic Safety Standards (EU-BSS): where are we now?
Dose management (DM): requirements, promises and reality
Statistics resources for radiology research
How to organise research in radiology
How to get my manuscript accepted: tips and tricks from the editors
How to get my manuscript accepted: getting help from reporting guidelines
Innovative tools to improve the communication between radiologists and patients
How to advance the academic ladder
Guidance for IT in radiology: how radiologist can benefit from DIAM (Digital Imaging Adoption Model)

E³ - Advanced Courses: Hot Topics in Emergency Radiology

Dual energy and subtraction CT in emergency radiology
The role of radiology in the management of mass casualty incidents
Occlusive vascular diseases: no time to lose!

E³ - Advanced Courses: Interactive Teaching Sessions for Young (and not so Young) Radiologists

Gastrointestinal radiology
Paediatric radiology for the general radiologist
Errare humanum est

E³ - ECR Master Class

Whole-body MRI (and PET/MR)
Update of diffusion-weighted MRI
State-of-the-art imaging of postoperative joints
Whole-body MRI in children
Cone-beam, 4D and more: new diagnostic tools for vascular diseases

E³ - European Diploma Prep Sessions

Interventional

E³ - Rising Stars Programme: Basic Sessions

Radiologic anatomy: abdomen
Hybrid imaging
Radiologic anatomy: chest
Musculoskeletal: essentials of trauma imaging
Abdominal viscera: abdominal emergencies
Genitourinary

EFOMP Workshop: CT protocol management and optimisation

CT protocol management and optimisation: management (part A)
CT protocol management and optimisation: optimisation (part B)

ESHI(MT) Session

The importance of identifying technical errors in hybrid imaging: pitfalls and artefacts in PET/CT and PET/MRI

EuroSafe Imaging Session

Paediatric CT doses and risks (MEDIRAD)
Technology developments which impact dose delivery 
Artificial intelligence for dose optimisation
Cumulative dose: too often and too much
Why do we need to know radiation doses in imaging procedures?
European study on clinical diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) (EUCLID) project: final results

Pros & Cons Session

Breast cancer: to screen or not to screen?

Refresher Course

New techniques in cardiac CT: game changers or money makers?
Imaging of 'foreign bodies'
Imaging of forgotten small joints
No time to lose: aortic disease, revisited
Imaging in abdominal emergencies: an (evidence-based) update
Practical computed tomography tips for radiographers
Blunt polytrauma: CT protocols, CT interpretation and interventional radiology options
Tumour response assessment in abdominal imaging
Back to basics: how to interpret a chest radiograph?
Contrast media: acute kidney injury and acute adverse reactions
Imaging of frequent queries in children: an evidence-based approach
Functional and molecular imaging techniques in oncology: how to use them in routine practice
Fluoroscopy: a mainstay state-of-the-art in paediatric radiology
Effect of the EU General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR): moving patients data across hospitals, regions, countries
Intensive care paediatric radiology: the very sick neonate
Blue skies and current trends in digital radiography (DR), computed tomography (CT) and interventional radiology (IR)
Imaging in pregnancy
MR imaging of the knee
Optimising the management of children with cancer: how to improve?
Demystifying MRI: things you always wanted to know
Everything you need to know about 3D post-processing
Current and future trends in personalised clinical dosimetry
Advancing clinical hybrid imaging
Why do I miss fractures in emergency?
The old spine: challenges of imaging and treatment

Transatlantic Course of ESR and RSNA (Radiological Society of North America): Stroke Imaging and Endovascular Treatment: Now and the Future

Current status of stroke work up and treatment
Endovascular treatment
The future strategy for stroke thrombectomy

Hands-on Workshop: Ultrasound

Hands-on Workshop: Vascular Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Musculoskeletal Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Advanced applications of Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Interventional Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Abdominal Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Musculoskeletal Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Vascular Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Abdominal Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Interventional Ultrasound
Hands-on Workshop: Advanced applications of Ultrasound
Ultrasound Quiz
Ultrasound Quiz

Physics in Medical Imaging Programme

In the ECR 2020 scientific programme, you can find custom-made courses designed specifically for physicists. The physics in medical imaging programme has been developed in collaboration with the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), and the ESR is proud that its annual meeting is attracting more and more physicists every year.

Coffee and Talk (open forum)

Imaging biobanks: from concept to implementation

E³ - Advanced Courses: Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence for image reconstruction: towards deep imaging?

E³ - Advanced Courses: Hot Topics in Emergency Radiology

Dual energy and subtraction CT in emergency radiology

EFOMP Workshop: CT protocol management and optimisation

CT protocol management and optimisation: management (part A)
CT protocol management and optimisation: optimisation (part B)

Joint Session of the ESR and EFOMP

Photon counting detectors: system design and clinical applications of an emerging technology

Joint Session of the ESR and ESMRMB

Ultrahigh-field (UHF) MR goes clinical and beyond

New Horizons Session

MRI of the future

Professional Challenges Session

Equipment purchasing decisions: a team approach

Refresher Course

Striking the balance: image quality assessment in radiological optimisation
Practical computed tomography tips for radiographers
Dose management in paediatric radiology
The role of medical imaging in radiotherapy
Blue skies and current trends in digital radiography (DR), computed tomography (CT) and interventional radiology (IR)
Practical magnetic resonance imaging tips for radiographers
Lung nodule management in 2020
Demystifying MRI: things you always wanted to know
Current and future trends in personalised clinical dosimetry
Radiation dose monitoring systems (RDMS): from commissioning to effective use

Special Focus Session

Quantitative MRI: from MR-physics to tissue microstructure

Research Sessions

The Research Presentation, My Thesis in 3 Minutes, and the Clinical Trials in Radiology sessions consist solely of your submissions, which contributes greatly to making the ECR a hub of the newest scientific research in radiology.

Research Presentations (RP)

The former abstract type “Scientific Paper” has been renamed to “Research Presentation” and will
allow a classic oral presentation of 6 minutes followed by a discussion.

During submission, you were able to indicate your preferred presentation format (Research Presentation, My Thesis in 3 Minutes or Clinical Trials in Radiology).

The final presentation formats will be decided by the Programme Planning Committee and communicated during acceptance notification.

Clinical Trials in Radiology (CTiR)

In the Clinical Trials in Radiology (CTiR) sessions at ECR 2020, researchers will present scientific evidence for imaging tests that are very likely to have an impact on clinical practice in the future.

During your research presentation submission, you were requested to indicate your prefered presentation format. In order to get accepted for the CTiR, your abstract(s) must fulfil the CTiR eligibility criteria:

  • Multicentre studies of any design (can be submitted with their study design, baseline data, or results)
  • Single-centre studies only if randomised and results available

My Thesis in 3 Minutes (MyT3)

Present your thesis in just three minutes!

Due to its great success, MyT3 sessions will take place once again during ECR 2020. These sessions are aimed at presenters who would like to share their thesis results in a dynamic and entertaining session.

So, if you submitted a thesis (MD, PhD, BSc or MSc) and have the skills to squeeze it into a quick-fire presentation of three minutes, you might become a part of the MyT3 session experience.

You could have indicated the MyT3 presentation format during your research presentation submission to enter your thesis for consideration!

Case-Based Diagnosis Training

Test your Knowledge

ECR 2020 will see the return of the popular session for general radiologists and residents at the end of their training looking for a simple update on subjects outside of their usual field.

The Case-Based Diagnosis Training session will offer an interactive way to test your knowledge in a range of subspecialty areas.

If you have any questions, please contact cbdt@myESR.org.

Air in the wrong place

While large amounts of fatty tissue or air pose serious obstacles for ultrasound, they are both our friends, when it comes to delineating anatomy and pathology in CT and even more so in x-rays. Air within hollow organs has a specific appearance, which we intuitively use as a roadmap navigating through unknown territory of soft tissue. On top of that, air or gas can tell us a lot about the patient, when we are prepared to read it correctly. Air will mark the passway of interventions like arthroscopy and cystoscopy, but also leave its traces after ERCP, sphincterotomy or choledochoduodenostomy.

Aerophagia after laryngectomy, excessive usage of chewing gum or carbonated drinks and anxiety can considerably increase gastrointestinal gas contents and location. An aerated Eustachian tube could speak for lack of brown fat in anorexia nervosa. Intramural air collection can alert us to ischemia or infection and extramural gas bubbles are signs of serious complications, which are easier to see on upright films or decubitus position with horizontal beam.

Air in the mediastinum and chest cavity draw our attention to perforation of trachea or lung. Asymmetric lung volume on expiration warns us of the possibility of non-radioopaque foreign bodies, particularly in infants. Tiny curvilinear amounts of gas in joints are normal, but bubbly musculoskeletal accumulations are hallmarks of gangrenous infections. The head and neck region is blessed with multiple air spaces and the only thing we have to do in reporting trauma cases is to track that little air bubble in the wrong space to depict minute fissures. And then there are of course areas, where you never ever want to come across air like the cranial vault, spinal canal, blood vessels and heart.

Are you now tuned to look for air in the wrong place and tempted to send us your best cases, so we can focus on them in the interlude presentation of our case based diagnosis session? Submit your cases using the template below to cbdt@myesr.org by December 15, 2019 at the latest.

Come and join us and maybe you will win the award for your excellent work-up. Before and afterwards you can try to solve clinical cases from ten different fields in radiology, where specialists then help to highlight typical characteristics and differential diagnostic entities.

Submission Template